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Where are they now - Stephen Kirby (SPC 2004-09)

author: Lorrie Liston

18 Feb

Where are they now - Stephen Kirby (SPC 2004-09)

The College reconnects with Stephen Kirby (SPC 2004-09) who was College Captain and is now working in the corporate law sector and has recently returned to Ballarat. Stephen recalls his many fond memories of his time at SPC.

 

Where has life taken you since leaving SPC?

I didn’t leave SPC for long after Year 12, returning the following year as the Audio Visual Trainee. I then moved to Geelong where I lived for about seven years. I completed a Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Management at Deakin University then started working as a lawyer at a law firm in Geelong. I briefly worked in the Ballarat office of the same firm, then accepted a job at a firm in Melbourne. I have since moved in-house, working in a corporate lawyer/assistant company secretary role at a state government-owned company, which I really enjoy. I have recently returned to live in Ballarat where I am about to build my first home. 

 

What are your fondest memories of your time at SPC?

There are many, but it was probably just getting to hang out with your mates every day.

 

Which teacher from your time at SPC had the greatest impact on you? Why?

I couldn’t isolate one teacher; there were many. In the junior school it was probably Kelvin Porter and Maree Moore, for the life lessons they taught. In the senior school it was Kieran Baxter, Geoff Brodie, Elizabeth Ryan, Sara Taylor, Nerella McDonald and Art Nichols. They were just all great teachers in their own way.    

 

How has your education shaped your professional life?

In many ways. It has helped me achieve what I have to date.

 

How has your time at SPC shaped your personal values and your family life?

One thing which St Patrick’s does really well is teach its boys about the reality of the world and develop a social conscience, that we should help those who can’t help themselves. It’s really evident in a lot of the work that some Old Boys choose to take on when they leave school. 

 

If you could pass on one message to the students of today, what would it be?

Enjoy the experience. You won’t travel that way again.